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The Longest Day • The Stones, Hell’s Angels & some band called Prince • 1981 (Part 2)


Well… I had to think about this one for a Few Days…because it was One of Those Life-Changing Moments in The Life of Federico.

I’ll Skip Over the George Thorogood & J.Geils Bands. I will say I’ve seen the George Thorogood Band a couple times since this day. Honestly how does a musician like this get to Be Famous? On sheer Attitude, because he can’t really play, he got No Style, No Soul. Just kind of a total White-Boy letdown, I assume like all his fans as well. He doesn’t look all Rocker-Foxy…at all. One of the few rock acts, when he comes on the radio, I turn that dial as fast as I get my hands on it. Just Bad. Never did see Faye Dunaway either. She was probably Chilling at the Polo Lounge, not slumming out there with all us White Boys & Hells Angels. White Boy Rock. Somehow I’ve got a little Latino & Blackness in me & my music preference, Part of the Reason I Love the Stones.

So, about this time, the Acid Kicks In. Only a half-tab., and the One & Only Time I ate it ever before or since. Perfect. Massive Crowd…I’m starting to realize The Only Way is To Rise Above It…literally ~

Ladies & Gentlemen, The Rolling Stones!

Stones Captive Audience ~ L.A. Coliseum Sept. '81

So..of course, All of Us Get Separated.. Good thing we had those Walkie-Talkies, smuggled in our back pockets. Amazing no real security back then, pretty much Anything Goes through the Front Gate. “Geo, come on, Breaker Buddy, I’m in the stands due North of Stones’ stage, 6 rows back, row 38..busting a move to the Field, what’s your 10-20? Over.” cssssshhhhhhh…pure static. I’ve got my sideman Jackie D. with me, and we’re getting ready to Charge the Field, along with a surging wave of  50,000 other Stones & no doubt Stoned Maniacs….

Fh, sporting rare full beard, Doing Recon, with Walkie-Talkie, Stones 1981

I’m starting to see some Rainbow Colors, and they’re not all coming from that Stage Backdrop 100 yards & A Sea of People in front of me. “C’mon, Jackie, we’re Going for It”.

So – Forward went the Charge of The Light (Headed) Brigade..seemingly beginning to Float on a Psychedelic Cloud. It’s So Beautiful ! And over The Sound of One-Hundred-Thousand Coliseum Gladiators Roaring at Top Volume. Jagger..”Well Alright..!” By now, I’m Gliding Forward on a Sea Of Rock & Roll to the Promised Land..Mick leading the charge, Jumping & Dancing forward, hands over his head, just fueling the massive crowd on Rock Nitro. Keith & Ronnie Wood, new to the band, replacing Mick Taylor from the 70’s era. I’ve seen Ronnie previously with Rod Stewart & Faces. He & Keith with matching chopped-up Rocker Shag hair, ripping it up on twin 60’s vintage Fender Telecasters…

An aside on the Stones, as I have seen them a few times now. Over a period of 20 years since this day..Keith & Ronnie always have their Trusty Fender old-skool Basketweave Twin Reverb amps on stage with them. Early 1960’s-era, thrashed cases, with no-doubt State-of-The Art TLC  to Keep those Babies Glowing. Wow, if those things could talk, the tales they would tell. Beat-up on the Outside but still Rocking on the Inside..

I know the Feeling All Too Well.

Something I have always admired about the most legendary Musicians I’ve seen. They can afford to their own Islands in the Carribean, be with some of the Hottest Ladies on the Planet. and in Mick’s case, be Knighted by the Queen of England, Sir Mick. No Small Honour. And yet they’re touring with 20-year $300. Fender amps backing them up, as they did and do still Sound the Best. Of course they’re playing through Monitors the Size of the World Trade Center Towers. Another example of this is Neil Young, who owns and has performed some of his most famous recordings with a 1940’s Martin acoustic guitar – Originally owned by none other than Hank Williams.

As I Glide on my Psychedelic Haze through the Crowd forward, I’m taking all this in. My Walkie-Talkie is chirping away in my back pocket, No Way in Hell to hear it, nor do I care, single-mindedlysurging ahead, by now So Smoothed-Out, I’m not even ruffling anyone’s feathers as I press on, to the Front of the Stage. The Gemini-Must Get to The Front in me, urging me forward on my Inescapable Quest. By now, my feet are off the ground. I’m so Chilled Out, I have made it to within about 50 feet from the front of the stage, Jagger directly in front of me. My feet are literally off the ground, as the crowd is so dense, I’m being held suspended about 6″ off my feet by Sheer Humanity…

Sir Mick in command of his armies, 1981

Being Elevated Above the Crowd by several inches, I am taking in a Commanding View. Jagger is strutting about & Looks Directly at Me. Our eyes lock for a moment, and we communicate as he has no doubt done with millions of others in his amazing career. For me, I feel I am The Stones-Whisperer for that instant. The crowd is surging back & forth with the force of an Ocean of People, but I am Riding the Wave, held suspended in a Stones Haze. This is my Moment of Rock Nirvana & The Essence of my Story…

Needless to Say, this moment was indeed the highlight of the day..My friend, who is quite Fearless, The Inimitable Jackie Davis, a Pure-Bred 22-year-old Irishman quite experienced in Mayhem of All Sorts, is nearly crushed to death by the crowd. On departure, he is speechless & cowering in a darkest back corner of my van, having nearly Met his Maker in his mind this day. We’ve briefly acquired the company of some Unattached Ladies, who have Crammed in Back with the Boys. They last for a bit further along in the day, before Disappearing as Mysteriously as they Arrived. I never did get all the details, for I am Le Chauffeur ~ What Goes on in Back of Limo, Stays in Back of Limo.

By Days’ End, around 10pm, after a Grueling 14 hours thus far, I’m letting the Boys Out the van, still riding the Aftermath of Acid, but in Command of my Wits. Suddenly I’m pounced upon from the front by none other than the Blazing Headlights of my friends, The Huntington Beach Police Department. My boys have summarily departed, save my Companero, Geo. Loyo, who’s still in back, in the Shadows of the Van Interior. The cop headlights have blazed a 1000 Watt Daylight Awakening into my windshield, and snapping me Back To Reality rather abruptly. I exit the front & greet my fate head-on, casually strolling to the Front of the Stage, suddenly inspired to throw down a Command Performance. “Hello Officers, what seems to be the problem here ?” As I commence to giving an Oscar-Worthy acting job to my Captive Audience, I faintly, ever so faintly feel the van back door open from within, as I am Casually Leaning on the Van. Geo is Silently Sanitizing the contents from the rear of the van into the bushes by reaching just outside through a crack in the door….

I proceed with my Acid-fused Command Performance, regaling the Police of our Stones Adventure, and ‘Gee, what a Fun Day it was, Officers, I’m SO Glad to be Home..!’ (I was not at home). Somehow by the Grace of God & Sir Mick looking over us, I manage to De-Fuse the Situation & escape Certain Death, had the Cops searched the van, or even look in back. Our friends leave us, and after one of my Greatest Days Ever, capped by the greatest Best Actor Effort I’ve ever put forth, before or since, I’m Maxed Out, enlisting the efforts of Geo Our Saviour, to drive us home.. and so ends (one of my many) Longest Days of all ~ And its Adventures…

Cheers, F of C

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LA aGo-Go : The Music & Club Scene in L.A. part3 • The Doors Emerge


The Doors ~ Venice Pier 1967

The Doors-early pre-performance rehearsal, Venice Beach 1965

The Doors & The Lizard King ~ 1965

When it comes to this era of The L.A.Club Scene, the Doors undeniably made a bigger mark on that history than any other band, by far. Even as an 8 year-old kid, I knew who they were, early on. They were from L.A, so they got a lot of L.A. Radio time & Press. The Doors were also signifigant as to marking the Emergence of L.A. based record label, Elektra, which later became Elektra-Asylum Records. An L.A. Rock powerhouse, producing records for not only the Doors but gaining considerable prestige on the music scene by being one of the first labels to sign up other leading acts from the new wave of American psychedelic rock of 1966–67. After All, Jim Morrison did write L.A. Woman, and This Story IS all About The L.A. Music Scene in the 60’s.. The Doors should be credited with bringing arguably the Biggest Notoriety to the Burgeoning L.A. Music Scene, especially with regard to the Sunset Strip & Whisky aGo Go. More than any other Band or Musician, The Doors Established L.A. as Rock City on the Map for Good.

Doors- pre-1st performance rehearsal, Venice late 1965

Rick & The Ravens, founded in 1961, was the band Ray Manzarek was in before he joined The Doors. The band recorded three singles on Aura Records before splitting up and reforming as The Doors in early October of 1965.

The band used to perform on weekends for college crowds, mostly from UCLA Film School, at a bar on 2nd Street and Santa Monica Blvd. in Santa Monica,California, called the Turkey Joint West[1], a British pub operated by the Santa Monica Soccer and Social Club[2], since 1974 known as Ye Olde King’s Head[3]. Their setlist consisted of their own originals, padded with standards such as “I’m Your Doctor, I Know What You Need,” “Louie, Louie,” Smokey Robinson‘s “Money” andWillie Dixon‘s “Hoochie Coochie Man.”

During that summer of ’65, Manzarek was living in Venice, south of Santa Monica. By accident, he ran into Jim Morrison. “I had been friendly with Jim at UCLA, and we had talked about rock ‘n’ roll even then. After we graduated, he said he was going to New York. Then, two months later, in July, I met him on the beach of Venice. He said he had been writing some songs, so we sat on the beach and I asked him to sing some of them. He did, and the first thing he tried was ‘Moonlight Drive’. When he sang those first lines…
“Let’s swim to the moon/ let’s climb through the tide/ penetrate the
evening/ that the city sleeps to hide” ….
I said, “That’s it”. I’d never heard lyrics to a rock song like that before. We talked we talked a while before we decided to get a group together and make a million dollars.”

In an interview conducted by Rainer Moddemann, Manzarek stated the first song Jim Morrison performed with Rick & the Ravens was Richard Berry‘s “Louie Louie.” Morrison was not officially part of the band at that time; Manzarek simply invited his former college colleague on stage, much to everyone’s surprise. Morrison was reportedly not prepared for this — his first public performance — and sang himself hoarse[4]. Morrison and Manzarek had met previously and found each other sharing a lot of musical and artistic interests. Later Manzarek asked Morrison to join the band; Morrison accepted.

Rick & The Ravens, Ray Manzarek on guitar, pre-funky organ, 1963

Although Rick & the Ravens do not sound at all like the Doors, they did play their small part in the early career of the Doors. On September 2, 1965 the band entered World Pacific Studios and recorded six songs that would eventually become Doors songs; “Moonlight Drive“, “My Eyes Have Seen You”, “Hello, I Love You“, “Go Insane” (the early title of “A Little Game” from the “Celebration of the Lizard” suite, known simply as “Insane” on the acetate), “End of the Night”, and “Summer’s Almost Gone“. The recording session was a relatively quick affair, only lasting three hours in total[5]. Singer Morrison was reportedly delighted to hear his voice on a record for the first time. The demo was released in its entirety on The Doors’ box set in 1997. The tracks on the box setwere mastered from what was originally Jim Morrison’s acetate–now in the possession of Ray Manzarek–which was one of only 5 made.

After the demo was recorded, the band tried to pass it around. Both Jim and Rick Manzarek were disappointed in the response to the demo — additionally both of the Manzareks, along Sullivan, were not impressed by the new Morrison songs[7] — and subsequently the Manzarek brothers, sans Ray, quit the band, stating they felt the band was “going nowhere fast

At Morrison’s suggestion[10] the band changed its name to The Doors a month after they had recorded the demo, shortly prior to Krieger joining the line-up. The band took their name from the title of a book by Aldous HuxleyThe Doors of Perception, which was in turn borrowed from a line of poetry by the 18th century artist and poet William Blake: “If the doors of perception were cleansed , everything would appear to man as it truly is, infinite.”

The 4 rehearsed for four or five months and played at a few private parties, including one given by Krieger’s parents.After practicing daily in a friend’s house behind the Santa Monica greyhound bus depot, The Doors made a humorously premature debut on the stage of UCLA’s Royce Hall, providing “live sound track” to a screening of Manzarek’s design film, “Who And Where I Live”. Krieger played guitar, Manzarek played flute, and Densmore, Morrison, and sundry girlfriends pounded on drums, rattles, claves, and tambourines.

Doors performance Poster - The London Fog, Sunset Strip 1966

The London Fog on the Strip, A banner announces the gig, 1966

A small, funky club called the London Fog located between the Hamburger Hamlet and the Galaxy on Sunset Strip was the first real club date for the Doors. They played for five dollars apiece on weeknights, double on weekends, seven nights a week, four sets per night. Because at the time they didn’t have sufficient original material for such a long gig, over half their set consisted of blues and rock ‘n’ roll classics, such asGloriaLittle Red Rooster and Who Do You Love? Once again, a faithful core of students from the UCLA film school followed them, but on the strip, a cross section of other listeners joined them.

 

 

More than anything else, the London Fog job provided them with the opportunity to play together steadily, experiment with their songs, and to develop as a working group. Jim Morrison in particular changed, progressing from a reserved stage style to his present flamboyant manner.

The Doors’ music was ardently defended by a growing segment of the Strip population, but it also just plain scared a lot of people. Eventually they were fired by the London Fog. But on the very last night of their four months at the London Fog, Ronnie Karan, the chic chick who booked talent for the Whisky aGo Go, came in to hear them.

“We were the house band at the London Fog, a pathetic little nightclub just down the street from the Whisky,” Manzarek says today. “The Whisky was mecca for us. That’s where all the big bands played. On our breaks, we’d walk down there and look in the doors and say, ‘We’re the band from down the street,’ and they’d just sort of laugh at us.”

When Ronnie Karan, the booker from the Whisky, finally caught the Doors’ act, she was impressed by Morrison’s primal stage-appeal and offered the group the house-band slot: The Doors would open for the headliners, playing two sets every night. Their very first night at the Whisky, the Doors opened for Them, culminating in both Morrisons (Van and Jim) jamming onstage to “Gloria.” Unfortunately, none of them had telephones (Morrison was then sleeping on the beach) and all they could give me was a number where John ‘sometimes’ could be reached. It took a month to contact them again, but I finally booked them into the Whiskey.” Miss Karan also helped The Doors join the Musicians’ Union, get new clothes, and organize the business side of their lives. Her tenacious insistence upon using them as more or less the Whiskey house-band, despite management objections, was the important break The Doors needed. They played second billing to everybody, including groups such as Love, Them, The Turtles, The Seeds, and the number one band in Mexico, The Loco’s. “The Loco’s were a real low point in our careers,” recalls Manzarek. “they were terrible, the kids hated them, and we were caught in the cross fire.” Exposed to a wide-ranging audience – hardened groupies to Iowa tourists – The Doors began to intensify their musical Gotterdammerung and to experiment daringly. Allegedly, the experiments often took the form of drug trips. “They all arrived stoned and started improvising at random- I  don’t know what it was, but it was great!” according to one friend of the group, Morrison was so consistently high on acid during this period that he could eat sugar cubes like candy without visible effect. But, inexplicably, the music kept getting better.

The Doors onstage at the Whisky

At the time, the Doors had only about fifteen songs. They would throw in some James Brown and Chicago blues covers, but playing two sets a night forced the group to quite literally expand its repertoire, thus shaping the band’s sound. “Repeat and stretch,” says Manzarek. ” ‘Light My Fire’ took off into solos. ‘The End’ became the epic we know now.”

Soon the house band developed a following of its own, and the Whisky became a destination for local counterculture types. Says Manzarek, “There were these guys named Carl and Vito who had a dance troupe of gypsy freaks. They were let in for free, because they were these quintessential hippies, which was great for tourists. God knows if they were even on anything, they were so out of their minds, but they danced like crazy. And they loved ‘The End.’

“There’s a point where Morrison has a section where he can do a little improvisation, and he put his hand out to soften us down,” Manzarek says. “And for the first time, he says, ‘The killer awoke before dawn. He put his boots on.’ And one by one, the dancers all stopped and stared. When he said, ‘Father, I wanna kill you,’ we’d never heard this before, but I thought, ‘I know what’s coming next. Please don’t do it.’ ”

Morrison, of course, did it. When he howled, “Mother, I want to fuck you!” the band, which had been softly accompanying his recitation, kicked into overdrive. As Manzarek recounts, “John [Densmore] whacked on his drums, I pounded on my organ, Robby [Krieger] made his guitar scream like a banshee, and all hell broke loose. The people began dancing madly. Everyone went into a Dionysian frenzy. It was Greek! Oedipus Rex had been exorcised right there on the Sunset Strip.”

The Doors left the stage thinking they’d killed, and they had. They had also offended Tanzini’s sense of propriety. He went backstage, asked Morrison, “How the fuck can you say that about your mother?” and fired the band on the spot. Krieger asked, “Do you want us to play through the weekend, or are we fired tonight?” Tanzini thought for a moment, then said, “Oh, right. You play through Sunday, then you’re fired.”

In the end, things worked out for the Doors. Two days earlier, the band had signed to Elektra Records: The L.A. rock scene would have new standard-bearers to lead the dancing gypsy freaks into the Summer of Love…


LA aGo-Go : The Music & Club Scene in L.A. part2 • The Venues & Roots


Cream ~ Ginger Baker & Eric Clapton, Whisky a Go Go 1967

The Lighthouse ~ Hermosa Beach, early 1960's

L.A. in the 60’s and All That Happened back then Obviously has Power Now like it did Then. Immediate Feedback from those who Remember it..I was just a Little Kid. Listening to the Music. Checking Out The Cars. The Movies. The People. The Girls. All The Crazy Events in the News. JFK. Space-The Astronauts, The Surf Scene. Drag Racing. It was a Powerful Time. It all came out in The Music. My Swinging 60’s Single Dad had a Triumph TR-3 sports car identical to the one above…he was probably in the Lighthouse grooving on the Jazz when this picture was taken for all I know…or maybe he was over in the Valley at Shelley’s Manne Hole, owned by Shelley Manne, of course. My Dad once punched out Jazz pianist Les McCann in one of these clubs, after McCann made a pass at my Mother from onstage. Decked him in the middle of the guy’s gig. My Dad was a Pretty Cool Cat .

Wish I had that Hemi Plymouth 2-Tone Station Wagon parked out front. The Ultimate SUV. Super Cool.Worth about $250. bucks back then. I Saw 50’s & Early 60’s Black Chevys jacked up with Flames down the sides, pinstriped to the max & Corvettes on Used Car lots for like $650.-700 bucks. Brand-New Hobie & Jacobs 8’6″surfboards were around $100. and gas was .23 cents a Gallon to run all those V-8’s. I wanted a Roth Rat Fink shirt so bad but my Dad wouldn’t let me buy one. My Dad had been in England in WWII in the AAF for 4 years fighting the Germans. Big Daddy & all the Chopper guys used to wear these plastic German Nazi helmets around & my Old Man didn’t think that was too cool at all. Can’t say that I blame him. So no Rat Fink shirt for me. They cost $1.50 in the mail-order Big Daddy ads in all the magazines. My allowance was .50 cents a week. I used to draw his style hot rods with the giant Slicks in back and Monster Freaks inside with a giant Blown Chevy Rat Motor in front belching flames & smoke out the back. So Cool..& I never stopped straight through school, college & straight into a Design career pura vida~for Better or Worse. Now I can make my own Roth shirts from digital scans and heat-press ’em on shirts myself. I just made ’em for all the kids around here for Christmas. They dug ’em just like Big Daddy would have wanted. In my 20′ I met him one time when he worked at Knott’s Berry Farm in the Sign Shop. My buddy’s Dad was his boss. Ohmigod. Big Daddy. He pinstriped out the entire old school Knott’s sign shop, top to bottom, inside& out. Wonder if it’s still there, it should be a California State Cultural Landmark. That guy was & is still one of my Heroes. He was a lot Cooler than Tiger Woods or some NFL Football Geek, that’s for Damn Sure.  A Cool Role Model. I was in awe of meeting him.

At the same time my Dad was going to the Lighthouse in Hermosa, Grooving to Chet Baker & Bud Shank West Coast Style, My Big Sister was very likely in the photo below at the same time..on the same night…She must be out there..looks just like Her Crew.

Meanwhile I was the Little Kid at home, shredding the Neighborhood on my Sting Ray, Skateboarding & Playing Baseball, Checking out the Mercury Astronauts and the X-15. But I Caught Up Later.

Orange County Quasi-Surf-Folkies -The Prison of Socrates, Balboa 1963

http://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/39007621-the-impacts

Go to the beach, Hermosa had the Lighthouse, a world-renowned Jazz Club.There were a lot of Music Sub- Cultures, reflecting on the California Culture..Jazz, Folk.Country/Western. All sub-cults of L.A. Go to the Valley and although the Postwar  50’s had brought housing tract subdivisions, many parts of the Valley still had a distinct rural Country Western Cowboy Vibe. It’s still like that if you look for it. These here folks went to The Palomino on Lankershim Blvd.

A venue that later in our story we will witness the Crossover of Country into Rock. California Rock, they called it.

Palomino Club ~ All C/W All the Time, Before California Rock 1967

'Mr. Record Man' Willie Nelson, pure C/W before the Big Time, Palomino Club.

In the 1940’s & 50’s L.A. had an emerging Jazz Scene that came to be known a West Coast, or ‘Cool Jazz’. The roots of Be-Bop, & West Coast Jazz derive from Swing Music, Country Swing, Country/Western, Black R& B, Blues, JumpN’Jive. The earliest Jazz L.A.Clubs were centered on Central Avenue in L.A., running into what is now Inglewood & Compton… the precursors of Rock.

Back Then Central Avenue was the center of the L.A. Music ‘Hood, Now instead of Bands playing Jazz from the doorways at night, we’ve got the 47 Hoovers & Crips Shootin’ it Up down there. But That is Another Story. Big-name Musicians from all over the U.S. played on Central Avenue. Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington. Be-Bop Greats Charlie Parker & Dizzy Gillespie, and a guy named Louis Jordan, whose Jump N’Jive sound I associate most with The L.A. Central Avenue ‘sound’ These predominantly Black musicians infused Big-Time Jazz on the West Coast…

By the Way, All those punk-ass White kids you see wearing their little Faux Fedoras they got at The Mall & thinking they’re rocking it ?..well, The Brothers were rocking that Look Big Time on Central 60 years ago…

Problemas a Los Cholos ~ East L.A. Mid '50's

West Coast white players like Alto Saxophonist Art Pepper, Baritone great  Gerry Mulligan and Trumpet player/Singer Chet Baker emerged from this  predominantly Black Music Scene and it all blended into West Coast Cool  Jazz ~

http://www.huntington.org/centralavenue/index.html

L.A. Cool Jazz Greats Chet Baker & Art Pepper, 1950's album cover

This was an altogether entirely Different Scene as to The Rock Scene that was happening at Gazzari’s, The Whiskey a Go Go, The Cheetah, Pandora’s Box, The Prison of Socrates, The Golden Bear in Huntington Beach, The Rendezvous Ballroom on the Newport Peninsula, although the True Hipsters, then as today, were moving around & checking out all of these Sub- Scenes…

Los Angeles, with Specialty Records (Little Richard) and Imperial Records (Fats Domino) based in L.A., and records like Chris Kennner’s “Land of a Thousand Dances” making their way on that pipeline to places like East L.A., where Cannnibal & the Headhunters would make it a huge hit :

This Transition from a Black-infused roots music base, filtered through a largely L.A White interpretation, with some exceptions al Latino Estilo East L.A Locales, Set The Stage for The Sunset Blvd. Rock & Psychedelic L.A. 60’s…

Rockin' Out at Gazarri's- '65

The Real Rock Music Scene was Really Happening at the Whisky a Go Go & Gazzari’s on the Sunset Strip. A lot of Other Bands & Musicians were in On the Act, but Winds of Change were in the Air, and L.A was About to Experience Something that Would Change The Face of Rock Forever..


LA aGo-Go : The Music & Club Scene in L.A. part1 • 1960-1966


Even though I was a Little Kid growing up in L.A in the 60’s, I had a Big Sister. She was 10 years older than me, a High-School Cheerleader, and one of the Most Popular Girls in School. My sister Nancy was Hip, & Pretty. (She still is). I grew up seeing all the Dance shows on T.V., like American Bandstand, Shindig & Hullaballoo. American Bandstand was the oldest one, filmed in New York with Dick Clark. Shindig & Hullaballoo were spinoffs and were filmed in L.A. So, I got firsthand, in-house Dance Lessons in the Living Room from my Sis, and all the Action in the background on T.V. I learned the Frug, The Jerk, The Twist & The Mashed Potato from her. My sister could do the Jerk Quite Well. A lot of this Action took place before the British Invasion..that is, before bands like Herman’s Hermits (they preceded …) The Beatles, The Stones, The Kinks, The Who a bit later, and so on.  So between 1960, when I was really small, going forward, I got an education.

Do the Twist! Chubby Checker Showin’ How it’s Done with C/W Star Conway Twitty  & American Bandstand host Dick Clark, 1960.

It all started with really innocuous Folk Music from the Eisenhower Beatnik 50’s. People like Pete Seeger, Peter, Paul & Mary, even Early Bob Dylan, & Joan Baez were pure White Folkies. My sister listened to all, her Favorites then, on her record player (if you know what That is, & Those are ?!) The Folkies played The Troubador, The C/W artists played the Palomino Club in the Valley. Those places really didn’t become Pop venues until the very late 60’s, early 70’s. The Folkies set the stage for a whole genre of Pop Music later in California. American Bandstand had  some cool East Coast acts and R&B people like Chubby Checker – “C’mon Baby, Let’s Do the Twist”! Chubby taught the whole World How to Do the Twist on that show, White People could Do the Twist, even JFK & Jackie were Doin’ It. There’s a Right Way and a Wrong Way To Do It. I saw James Brown on that show, Ike & Tina. Then The Supremes were on The Ed Sullivan Show from New York. Ed Sullivan was ‘The Reeelly Biigg Shewww’, which was how it sounded when he said it. Elvis had been on there. That Show was a Big Deal. I thought the Black Artists were Cool right from the start. They could Dance, man, they were Hip. This is all way before Motown. Watch Diana Ross from that time…Michael Jackson grew up watching her too, my same age. Watching Diana Ross back then is the Catalyst for Michael Jackson. He Stole All her Moves…I had a Big Crush on Diana Ross. She was Fine. I was 7.

L.A. Pop Radio was all AM then… KRLA & KHJ were the Cool Stations. The Coolest songs sounded the best cranked up through the crappy little speakers in Car Radios. Everybody had Cool Cars Back Then..Cool American Ones with Big Back Seats for Makin’ Out at the Drive-In with KRLA Blasting. So This was the Environment into which the L.A.Music Scene was Born. Personally, I was Making the Scene at the Drive-In in my Pajamas & Chuck Taylors. There was a playground going in front of the movie screen before it got dark. And Rock was Blasting while I shredded on the Swing Set. I was listening.

Sonny & Cher on Shindig-1964 “I Got You Babe”

My Sister was like 17, and she was going to the L.A.Clubs. One you never read or hear about now, but was one of the Hip Clubs in L.A. back then was the Cinnamon Cinder. And Gazzari’s, and of course The Whisky a Go Go…where do Go Go Girls come from..? The Whisky. There you GoGo…

The Folkies played The Troubador, The C/W artists played the Palomino Club in the Valley. But those places really didn’t become Pop venues until the very late 60’s, early 70’s, more on those later…

Go Go Dancers-Whisky a GoGo-1964

Pop Music got harder sounding, edgier. Less horns & arrangements, leftover from the Big Band Sounds of the 30’s and 40’s. Rock was really taking hold. Kids were starting to Hang Out in front of the Clubs on Sunset. The Scene was Heating Up.

The Whisky a Go Go  on the Sunset Strip was founded by Elmer ValentinePhil Tanzini, Shelly Davis, and attorney Theodore Flier in January 1964. Though the club was billed as a discothèque, suggesting that it offered only recorded music, the Whisky a Go Go opened with a live band led by Johnny Rivers and a short-skirted female DJ Rhonda Lane ,spinning records between sets from a suspended cage at the right of the stage. When, in July 1965, the DJ danced during Rivers’ set, the audience thought it was part of the act and the concept of Go-Go dancers in cages was born. The Whisky a Go Go was one of the places which popularized the Go-Go dancing. Elmer Valentine, in a 2006 Vanity Fair article, recalled arranging to have a female DJ play records between Rivers’ sets so patrons could continue dancing. But because there wasn’t enough room on the floor for a DJ booth, he had a glass-walled booth mounted high above the floor.[5][6]

Whisky a Go Go Dance Floor –  ’64

Around this time the British invasion began. With them came Jangling guitar riffs and Vox organs, for me the signature early British Rock sound. The earliest and one of the best British bands I remember hearing pre-Beatles, pre-Stones and the rest was Eric Burdon & The Animals. Their sound would seriously influence another band to come a year or so later, in 1966. They were a lot Dirtier & Nastier than the Beatles, a la the Stones.. more L.A. Sounding. More my Style.

Show poster for the Animals at the Whisky- 1966

In true L.A.Fashion-Musical Styles were merging, White Folk sounds with East-Coast generated Black R &B, and the British Invasion brought White Rockers like the Animals & Rolling Stones, Van Morrison & Them, emulating a Blues Sound from the Animals & The Rolling Stones. Blues bands were some of the first to play the Burgeoning L.A.Club scene around this time..and soon THE L.A. Band of the Era would emerge…L.A’s own The DOORS, were about to hit the Scene, but in my opinion The Doors were not the most original and by far not the best…

L.A. now had White Blues & Folk artists – some American, some British, some East Coast Black R&B artists like Otis Redding. Two other New distinct genres of Rock entered the L.A. Scene in the form of 2 new artists. Nearby The Sunset Strip, in a rural community in the Hills of Laurel Canyon passing between Hollywood & the San Fernando Valley, a group of musicians were singing, playing & songwriting in a distinct Folk, yet edgier Electric Rock sound, unique to California.

Donovan with Sitar-1967

The second artist – from Britain, emerged on the scene. His name was Donovan Leitch, or known as Donovan. His music would have far-reaching effects on California & American Rock Music, the roots of Glam Rock.

Also a group of Rock musicians from the Bay Area and a place called Fillmore West were making their way South to L.A.

More to come…


California’s BAD GIRL Punk Band – The RUNAWAYS !


California's Faux Fashionistas - THE RUNAWAYS - Creem Magazine 1976

So I thought to Myself…Federico, you’ve got a New Blog..and thus far you’ve written 2 articles on some of the Baddest Boys in California..up to a point. You Owe it to the Ladies of California to keep a Sensitive Balance to things here, so Something for the Ladies…It Turns out in my Early research on these Bad Girls, (including seeing them Rock The Cuckoo’s Nest in Costa Mesa & Whiskey a Go Go Hollywood in 1977-Yeah ! ) there is a Hollywood Biopic Movie being released in 2010 on These Lurid Ladies…

So Let’s Check Them OUT For Reals….

The Story of the RUNAWAYS…California’s First & Fastest All-Girl Punk Band…ROCK ON LADIES…!!!

The Runaways from left to right: Sandy West, Jackie Fox, Cherrie Currie, Lita Ford, Joan Jett.

Runaways Singer Cherie Currrie (r) • Van Nuys 1976 photo© Brad Elterman

Us Boys Were Stoked..! We’d been Listening to the Laid-Back Eagles, or to Get our Ya-Ya’s – The Stones & Even Stonier Led Zeppelin. But Bald-Headed Ian Anderson & Jethro Tull was a Burnout. Guys like Mick & Rod ‘The Mod’ Stewart & The Faces were getting all The Babes Like Bianca & Britt Ekland.  There wasn’t even Really L.A. Radio to Deal with Punk Rockers yet, in 1975. PowerHouse KMET, A GREAT L.A. Radio Station – Played Power Rock like Ted Nugent & Deep Purple & Glam Boys Bowie & T.Rex and then All the Girls went Ga-Ga Glam on Us. The Precursors to Punk.. The Ramones Hadn’t Hit California Yet…They were in New York with David Johansen & the New York Dolls & Iggy Pop. THEN We Heard Some Screaming Rocking GIRLS on the Airwaves- THE RUNAWAYS…AND they Were HOT..!! Their First Big Hit was CHERRY BOMB…So, Well..Yeah !! HOT GIRL ROCKERS…Rocking it in Lingerie & Heels & Shag Haircuts, Leather & Plum Lipstick…Thank You God…Finally !!

The Runaways were formed in late 1975 by drummer Sandy West and rhythm guitarist Joan Jett. They had introduced themselves (on separate occasions) to producer Kim Fowley stating their ideas to form an all-girl band. Fowley, who was always looking for the next big thing, gave Jett’s phone number to West. The two met on their own to discuss the possibilities. After rehearsing together, the pair contacted Fowley to let him hear the results. Fowley then helped the girls find the other members.

Joan Jett • Tropicana Motel, L.A. 1978 photo© Brad Elterman

Although Fowley would continue to take credit in the press for creating the band and the music, he would later admit, “I didn’t put The Runaways together, I had an idea, they had ideas, we all met, there was combustion and out of five different versions of that group came the five girls who were the ones that people liked”.

Starting as a power trio with bassist Micki Steele, The Runaways began the party and club circuit around Los Angeles. In 1976, they added 16-year-old lead guitarist Lita Ford and lead singer Cherie Currie to the lineup. Bassist Micki Steele left the group, later resurfacing in The Bangles. An unknown local bassist named Peggy Foster took over on bass but also left after only a few weeks. Kim Fowley then brought Ann Boleyn, who later went on to perform with Hellion and Detente, as the bass player. Finally, Jackie Fox (who had originally auditioned for the lead guitar spot) was added on bass, and the line up was complete.

I worked in an Industrial Park in Costa Mesa, just next to the Legendary Rock Club- The Cuckoo’s Nest. Us Boys heard the Runaways were going to play it & we were Stoked ..! Back then you had to go to a store like Wallich’s Music City or a Ticket Agency to get your tickets..No Internet for pre-sale. That’s where guys like Damone in ‘Fast Times at Ridgemont’ came from..We would go wrangle a bunch of tickets & scalp them to people during lunch in the Quad at school, we would charge like $15. instead of the $7.50 they cost us at Wallich’s. ( I think I paid around $40. for 2 tickets to see Bowie with Mick Ronson & The Spiders from Mars in San Diego…I was THE MAN with those tickets & had a Very Hot Date that night…) but, back to our story…

We made it to the Show- in my Bad new Black ’78 Chevy Van with killer Mag rims & Pioneer SuperTuner 8-Track blasting our Girls..Styled out in our Zeppelin Jeans, Platforms & Shags…

There were often confrontations with the punks from the Cuckoos Nest and the cowboys from Zubies, which shared a parking lot. The police were constantly harassing the punks. Club owner Jerry Roach fought a number of court cases in an effort to keep the club alive, and in his 1981 film on the subject Urban Struggle he suggested that perhaps this was the first time that the authorities would stamp out a fad. [1] The club was a hub of the punk rock in California. The club is notable as being home to the first slam pit. Bands such as 999The RamonesThe Damned, the New York DollsBlack Flag (band)TSOLCircle JerksD.I., and Social Distortion all played gigs there. The club was memorialized in the Vandals song “Pat Brown,” a song about a clubgoer who actually tried to run the cops into the ground.

The RAMONES - Cuckoo's Nest 1978

Runaways-1978 Looking & Sounding HOT !

In the summer of 1977 the group arrived in Japan for a string of sold out shows. The Runaways were the number 4 imported music act in Japan at the time, behind only Led ZeppelinABBA, and Kiss in terms of album sales and popularity. The girls were unprepared for the onslaught of fans that greeted them at the airport. The mass hysteria was later described by guitarist Jett as being “like Beatlemania[3]. While in Japan, The Runaways had their own TV special, did numerous television appearances and released a live album that went gold. While in Japan, bassist Jackie Fox left the band shortly before the group was scheduled to appear at the 1977 Tokyo Music Festival.[4] Jett temporarily took over bass duties and when the group returned home they replaced Fox with 17 year old Vicki Blue.

Singer Cherie Currie then left the group and Jett, who previously shared vocals with Currie, took over lead vocals full time. The band released their 4th album,Waiting For The Night and started a world tour with their friends The Ramones. Currie released a solo LP Beauty’s Only Skin Deep, produced by Kim Fowley, and began a separate U.S. tour, which included her identical twin sister Marie.

Dissolution

Due to disagreements over money and the management of the band, The Runaways and Kim Fowley parted ways in 1978. The group quickly hired new management, who also worked for Blondie and Suzi Quatro. When the group split with Fowley, they also parted with their record label Mercury/Polygram, to which their deal was tied. In the Edgeplay documentary, members of the group (especially Fox and Currie) as well as the parents of Currie and West, have accused Fowley and others assigned to look after the band of using divide and conquer tactics to keep control of the band, as well as verbal and sexual abuse of the band members.

Bassist Vicki Blue left the group and was replaced by Laurie McAllister. The band reportedly spent much time enjoying the excesses of the rock n’ roll lifestyle during this time. They partnered with Thin Lizzy producer John Alcock, (after Jett’s future partner Kenny Laguna turned down the job) to record their last album And Now … The Runaways.

The band played their last concert on New Year’s Eve Day of 1978 and broke up in April 1979.

The Runaways Paved The Way for Other Girl Crossover Bands like The Go-Go’s, Pat Benatar , Heart (? Borderline at best), Blondie, & looking ahead to Ladies Like Courtney Love, A TRUE Rocker in her own right. Listen to Their Music & You Will Definitely Hear The RUNAWAYS-

The First True California QUEENS OF NOISE ! Come & Get it Boys  !

Runaways-CHERRY BOMB 45rpm Single